Economic industries – Hotel Oliebol http://hoteloliebol.com/ Sat, 21 May 2022 12:01:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hoteloliebol.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-1-120x120.png Economic industries – Hotel Oliebol http://hoteloliebol.com/ 32 32 Why digitization is our best chance to save the planet https://hoteloliebol.com/why-digitization-is-our-best-chance-to-save-the-planet/ Sat, 21 May 2022 12:01:48 +0000 https://hoteloliebol.com/why-digitization-is-our-best-chance-to-save-the-planet/ To defeat the climate crisis and mitigate its impacts, we must unleash the power of digitalization. Digital technology could provide a fifth of the emissions reductions we need to reach net zero by 2050. Here are three principles to follow as we accelerate the digital revolution. Fortunately, climate change is now a major issue. Businesses, […]]]>
  • To defeat the climate crisis and mitigate its impacts, we must unleash the power of digitalization.
  • Digital technology could provide a fifth of the emissions reductions we need to reach net zero by 2050.
  • Here are three principles to follow as we accelerate the digital revolution.

Fortunately, climate change is now a major issue. Businesses, policy makers and the public already know the necessity (and cost) of green economies, the importance of protecting biodiversity and the fact that business as usual is unsustainable.

The question is what do we do with it. And while there are many ways to fight climate change, they often boil down to one word: reduce.

Makes sense. We should reduce the amounts of fossil fuels we burn. We should reduce deforestation. We should reduce the amount of waste we produce.

But not all discounts are equal.

The degrowth movement, for example, argues that successful climate action requires not prioritizing economic growth. This would lead to reductions, for sure – reductions in the standard of living, in the provision of health care and in people’s ability to earn wages. Degrowth may have romantic appeal, but it is neither practical nor realistic, especially in the midst of a global cost of living crisis.

Instead, we should focus more on “more”. We should strive to make renewable energy more efficient, industry more productive, policy-making more urgent and business more transparent.

This positive vision depends on a specific “plus”: more digitization.

There is no green without digital. This is the ultimate activation process. As well as becoming greener – studies suggest 5G networks are up to 90% more energy efficient per unit of traffic than traditional 4G networks, for example – digitalization is also enabling huge environmental gains in other areas. sectors.

Recent estimates from the World Economic Forum and Accenture suggest that digital technologies could provide up to a fifth of all reductions needed to meet 2050 net zero targets for energy, materials and mobility [ADD LINK]. And that’s not to mention other sectors such as logistics and manufacturing.

1. Power Generation

Today’s largest offshore wind turbines are more than twice as high as those installed just five years ago.

But the larger the turbine, the further it needs to be from the sea and the more complicated the maintenance process.

Digitization can offer a range of solutions. For example, covering even the largest wind farms with a single private wireless network can unlock solutions such as predictive maintenance, repair analysis drones, and augmented reality engineering. As a result, engineers sail fewer trips and more turbines can be maintained at peak power.

Digitalization also makes other forms of energy production more efficient. For example, advances in artificial intelligence (AI) are making “tracker” solar panels, which follow the sun during the day, up to 45% more productive than static panels.

In addition to making it easier to integrate renewables into the grid, fully digitized, AI-driven energy systems can identify who needs energy, when they need it, and deliver it at the lowest possible cost.

Such digitization will allow the integration of virtually unlimited renewable energies into the grid, as variations in production can be compensated instantaneously either by other energy sources or by adjusting demand.

A small-scale example is Nokia’s project with Siemens and A1, creating an ultra-efficient microgrid for the Siemens corporate campus in Vienna. The microgrid meets the energy needs of the campus through the generation of wind and solar energy on site. This reduces reliance on offsite energy and reduces on-campus carbon emissions by approximately 100 tonnes per year in 2021, with double that figure projected for this year. [ADD LINK]

2. Digital agriculture

The UN predicts that farms will have to produce 70% more food, on 5% more land, by 2050. Digitalization can make this possible.

The classic example is burying sensors in the ground, ensuring that crops receive exactly the right amount of water and fertilizer.

It’s valuable, but it’s not the end of the story.

Satellites and drones can use biomass-sensitive imagery to assess the health of large areas of crops. Connected farm machinery can combine this data with information on soil conditions, weather forecasts and seed availability to keep farms running at peak efficiency.

Digitizing 15-25% of global agriculture in this way could increase global production by 300 million metric tons by 2030 and reduce water consumption by up to 150 billion cubic meters each year.

One problem, as a recent EY study suggests, is that farmers may be reluctant to share data. It’s a tricky question. Almost every industry and institution is currently struggling with a trust deficit.

Digitization alone cannot solve this problem, but digitizers can do their part by recognizing the importance of reliability and security, and working with trusted partners while deploying digitization.

Global net zero commitments from businesses and governments are expected to reduce GHG emissions by 7.5% by 2030 – we need 55% to meet global targets. Closing this gap will require reconnecting high-emitting sectors around efficiency, circularity and sustainability.

Research from the World Economic Forum’s Digital Transformation Initiative and Accenture estimates that digital technologies, if scaled, can deliver up to 20% of the reductions we need by 2050 in three high-emitting industries: energy, materials and mobility. Depending on how quickly digital technologies are adopted, these industries can achieve between 4 and 10% reduction in emissions by 2030.

Four different digital technology clusters can work together to decarbonize business operations and value chains:

1. Fundamental technologies such as big data analytics

2. Decision Support Technologies like AI/Machine Learning and Digital Twins

3. Enabling technologies such as cloud, 5G, blockchain and augmented reality

4. Sensing and control technologies such as Internet of Things (IoT), drones and automation

To inspire more adoption and collaboration, the Forum is also curating an inventory of leading examples of partner companies that have implemented digital technologies to reduce their carbon footprint and drive economic growth.

If your organization is interested in embracing digital technologies for climate action, join the Forum’s cross-sector digital transformation community.

What is the next step in digitization?

We know the will exists to accelerate this process. Watch the First Movers Coalition – a public-private partnership involving the World Economic Forum, Nokia and other contributors who pledge to buy new sustainable technologies.

Discussions on digitization here in Davos should keep three principles in mind:

1. The only realistic path to net zero involves mobilizing market forces.

The EU created the first-ever emissions trading system. Between 2005 and 2020, the emissions covered by the system fell by more than 40%.

We can replicate this elsewhere.

2. Radio Spectrum Issues.

Almost all wireless telecommunications require some radio spectrum to operate. Without it, none of the use cases mentioned here would be possible.

The problem is that it is a limited resource. Ultimately, governments control who has access to what spectrum. They should release affordable new spectrum across low, mid, high and ultra-high band ranges – and companies and other stakeholders should continue to press them to do so.

3. Companies have a responsibility to do the right thing.

Play by the rules, behave ethically and build trust.

In other words, making technology and technology companies a force for good.

Be proactive. Pursue your waste and emissions goals with the same innovative attitude you use for any business-critical issue.

And finally, digitize. Hurry up. Get a head start. The planet is counting on you.

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Global Optical Emission Spectroscopy Industry Expected to Hit $2 Billion by 2027 – ResearchAndMarkets.com https://hoteloliebol.com/global-optical-emission-spectroscopy-industry-expected-to-hit-2-billion-by-2027-researchandmarkets-com/ Thu, 19 May 2022 13:24:00 +0000 https://hoteloliebol.com/global-optical-emission-spectroscopy-industry-expected-to-hit-2-billion-by-2027-researchandmarkets-com/ DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The “Global Optical Emission Spectroscopy Market (2022-2027) Report by Supply, Form Factor, Detector Type, Excitation Source Type, End User, Competitive Analysis, and Covid-19 Impact with Ansoff analysis” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. The Global Optical Emission Spectroscopy Market is estimated at USD 932.46 Million in 2022 and is projected to reach USD […]]]>

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The “Global Optical Emission Spectroscopy Market (2022-2027) Report by Supply, Form Factor, Detector Type, Excitation Source Type, End User, Competitive Analysis, and Covid-19 Impact with Ansoff analysis” has been added to from ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

The Global Optical Emission Spectroscopy Market is estimated at USD 932.46 Million in 2022 and is projected to reach USD 2,155.03 Million by 2027, growing at a CAGR of 18.24%.

Market dynamics are forces that are impacting pricing and stakeholder behaviors in the global Optical Emission Spectroscopy market. These forces create price signals that result from changes in the supply and demand curves for a given product or service. The forces of market dynamics can be related to macro-economic and micro-economic factors. There are dynamic market forces other than price, demand and supply. Human emotions can also drive decisions, influence the market and create price signals.

As market dynamics impact supply and demand curves, policymakers aim to determine how best to use various financial tools to stem various strategies aimed at accelerating growth and reducing risk.

Competitive Quadrant

The report includes Competitive Quadrant, a proprietary tool to analyze and assess the position of companies based on their industry position score and market performance score. The tool uses various factors to classify players into four categories. Some of these factors considered for analysis are financial performance over the past 3 years, growth strategies, innovation score, new product launches, investments, market share growth, etc

Ansoff analysis

The report presents a detailed analysis of the Ansoff matrix for the global optical emission spectroscopy market. Ansoff Matrix, also known as Product/Market Expansion Grid, is a strategic tool used to design business growth strategies. The matrix can be used to assess approaches in four strategies viz. Market development, market penetration, product development and diversification. The matrix is ​​also used for risk analysis to understand the risk associated with each approach.

The analyst analyzes the global optical emission spectroscopy market using the Ansoff matrix to provide the best approaches a company can take to improve its position in the market.

Based on the SWOT analysis conducted on the industry and industry players, the analyst has designed appropriate strategies for market growth.

Why buy this report?

  • The report offers a comprehensive assessment of the global Optical Emission Spectroscopy market. The report includes in-depth qualitative analysis, verifiable data from authentic sources, and market size projections. Projections are calculated using proven research methodologies.

  • The report has been compiled through extensive primary and secondary research. The main research is done through interviews, surveys and observations of renowned personnel in the industry.

  • The report includes in-depth market analysis using Porter’s 5 forces model and Ansoff’s matrix. Additionally, the impact of Covid-19 on the market is also presented in the report.

  • The report also includes the regulatory scenario in the industry, which will help you to make an informed decision. The report discusses the major regulatory bodies and major rules and regulations imposed on this industry across various geographies.

  • The report also contains competitive analysis using Positioning Quadrants, the analyst’s proprietary competitive positioning tool.

Market dynamics

Drivers

  • Strict government safety regulations and quality control requirements

  • Technological improvements and increased functionality

Constraints

  • High initial cost associated with OES equipment

Opportunities

  • Growing requirement for multi-element analysis in the environmental, pharmaceutical and life sciences, scrap and recycling, and food and beverage industries

  • Growing preference to outsource analytical requirements to third-party service providers

Challenges

  • Lack of qualified personnel for handling OES equipment

Market segmentation

The global optical emission spectroscopy market is segmented on the basis of supply, form factor, detector type, excitation source type, end user, and geography.

  • By Offer, the market is classified under Equipment and Services.

  • By Form factor, the market is categorized into Portable and Benchtop.

  • By type of detector, the market is categorized into photomultiplier tube, solid state detector and hybrid.

  • By Type of excitation source, The market is categorized into Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Spark Optical Emission Spectroscopy.

  • By Final user, the market is categorized into infrastructure, oil & gas, energy & power, automotive, food & beverage, aerospace & defense, metals & heavy machinery, environment, and others.

  • By Geography, the market is categorized into Americas, Europe, Middle East & Africa, and Asia-Pacific.

Companies cited

  • Agilent Technologies Inc.

  • Analytik Jena GmbH

  • Bruker Corp.

  • Office Veritas

  • Elvatech Ltd

  • Focused Photonics Inc

  • GBC Scientific Equipment Pty Ltd

  • GNR Analytical Instrument Group

  • Hitachi High-Technologies Corp.

  • Horiba S.A.

  • Intertek Group plc

  • Perkin Elmer

  • SGS S.A.

  • Shimadzu Corp.

  • Celestial ray instrument

  • Spectro Scientific Inc (AMETEK)

  • Teledyne Leeman Laboratories

  • Thermo Fisher Scientific

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/s0v76c

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MEDIA ADVISORY: Women’s Leadership Conference Explores STEM and Mental Health | https://hoteloliebol.com/media-advisory-womens-leadership-conference-explores-stem-and-mental-health/ Tue, 17 May 2022 17:24:40 +0000 https://hoteloliebol.com/media-advisory-womens-leadership-conference-explores-stem-and-mental-health/ As Connecticut moves past the pandemic, women play a critical role. Business Leaders and Legislators Explain How They Overcome Challenges at AABC’s May 19 Conference When Women Lead conference. First female CEO of AVANGRID Catherine Stempien opens this year’s conference, recounting how she broke through the glass ceiling to lead the energy company’s largest business […]]]>

As Connecticut moves past the pandemic, women play a critical role. Business Leaders and Legislators Explain How They Overcome Challenges at AABC’s May 19 Conference When Women Lead conference.

First female CEO of AVANGRID Catherine Stempien opens this year’s conference, recounting how she broke through the glass ceiling to lead the energy company’s largest business unit.

The Jackson Laboratory Lisa RoyWestminster Tool Hillary Thomas and Flora Padro, Principal of Hartford Public High School, discuss paving the way for other women to find meaningful careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

CEO of the Women’s Business Development Council Francois Pastore conducts a conversation with state officials Tammy Exum and Tammy Nuccio and state senators Christine Cohen and Heather Somers.

Certified Clinical Social Worker and TEDx Featured Speaker Jelan Agnew, from the Copper Beech Institute, shares strategies for self-preservation in the office and beyond.

Media wishing to attend should contact Ali Warshavsky (860.244.1929).

When Women Lead is produced by CBIA and made possible with the generous support of AVANGRID and Oma’s Pride.


CBIA is Connecticut’s largest business organization, with thousands of member companies, large and small, representing a wide range of industries from all regions of the state. For more information, please contact Ali Warshavsky (860.244.1929).

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Shanghai restarts operations and services in phases, with over 10,000 outlets in operation https://hoteloliebol.com/shanghai-restarts-operations-and-services-in-phases-with-over-10000-outlets-in-operation/ Sun, 15 May 2022 15:09:00 +0000 https://hoteloliebol.com/shanghai-restarts-operations-and-services-in-phases-with-over-10000-outlets-in-operation/ Shanghai residents line up to shop at a supermarket amid the resumption of business. Photo: CGV With supermarkets, malls and convenience stores in Shanghai set to reopen from Monday, flights between Shanghai and some other cities set to resume, and as companies like Tesla and SAIC Volkswagen resume production and even exports of their vehicles, […]]]>

Shanghai residents line up to shop at a supermarket amid the resumption of business. Photo: CGV

With supermarkets, malls and convenience stores in Shanghai set to reopen from Monday, flights between Shanghai and some other cities set to resume, and as companies like Tesla and SAIC Volkswagen resume production and even exports of their vehicles, the city with a population of about 25 million regains its economic capacity.

The market recovery, which comes after nearly two months of business suspension, shows the government’s determination to strike a balance between epidemic control and economic recovery.

Shanghai is set to restart commercial and service activities in phases from Monday, with shopping malls, supermarkets, pharmacies, wet markets, catering and hairdressing services to resume offline operations as soon as possible. orderly, Chen Tong, deputy mayor of Shanghai, announced at a press conference. briefing on Sunday.

The resumption of trade and business activities will be carried out in phases according to the principle of orderly opening, limited flow, effective control and classified management. Special passages will be designated for businesses to limit the flow of personnel, while wholesale food markets are also allowed to conduct contactless transactions to control traffic.

According to Chen, the number of commercial outlets in operation in the city increased to 10,625 from the lowest number at less than 1,400, with the daily number of delivery orders reaching 5 million.

A vendor named Lin selling meat products at a grocery store in Minhang district told the Global Times on Sunday that the grocery store had obtained the permit as a daily necessities supplier and would reopen on Monday.

In order to apply for the permit, the applicant must provide business licenses, negative results for nucleic acid tests and antigen tests, and other application documents. They must also take regular nucleic acid tests after resuming activities.

“I hope the outbreak can be contained and the lockdown lifted as soon as possible, as my fellow sellers and I are not sleeping at all in the shabby premises of the store and we have to eat either instant noodles or food. shared by nearby residents, which is rather difficult,” said Lin, who has been sleeping at the store for two months.

As the city releases the “pause button” and expands the scope of business resumption, it is particularly aimed at helping businesses involving commercial enterprises restart operations. Gu Jun, director of the Shanghai Municipal Commission of Commerce, said at the press conference that Shanghai has drawn up a business resumption guide for major foreign trade enterprises and issued two batches of “whitelists” for 704 major foreign trade enterprises, which cover retail trade. , services, foreign company headquarters and port services.

About 63% of the first batch of 142 whitelisted business enterprises have resumed operations, and the second batch of 562 enterprises are preparing to restart. The third batch of 820 whitelisted companies will be released soon, Gu said.

Phased reopening

“Hanging the ‘trade button’ in Shanghai for too long will not only disrupt global supplies, as Shanghai is a leading global logistics hub, but also pose the risk of supply chains leaving China. If this happens , it is certainly much more difficult to recover these industries even after the coronavirus is under control,” Xi Junyang, a professor at Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, told the Global Times on Sunday.

Businesses are actively coordinating with the government’s return to work arrangements.

South Korean cosmetics giant Amore Pacific, for example, told the Global Times via a written statement that the first group of employees had gradually returned to the company’s factory in Shanghai’s Jiading district to resume work. work.

The company has taken multiple measures to ensure the stability of its business operations, including the closed-loop management of its employees, the designation of special driving routes and unloading sites for its logistics vehicles, as well as the use company warehouses and logistics centers in other cities to ease the logistics pressure.

“COVID will not affect our confidence in China’s long-term development,” said Mike Hwang, chairman of Amorepacific China.

Tesla is also expected to export the second batch of vehicles worth about 4,000 to overseas markets, having already shipped about 4,700 electric cars after work resumed on May 11, a report by kankanews.com noted on Sunday. .

Besides commercial enterprises, many industries are gradually resuming normal operations after some downtime.

Shanghai-based Spring Airlines and Juneyao Airlines will resume services from Monday amid a gradual decline in the number of daily new positive infections in the city.

Juneyao Airlines told the Global Times it will resume flights between Shanghai Pudong and Fujian’s Longyan from Monday, the company’s first domestic passenger flight from Shanghai since the city’s closed-loop management.

Shanghai’s manufacturing sector is accelerating the pace of work resumption. Overall, nearly 50 percent of Shanghai’s 9,000 large-scale industrial enterprises have resumed work, a local government official said Friday.

As one of the companies in the first group of companies on the whitelist, SAIC’s production line has resumed production and all staff are under closed-loop management, a staff member told the Global Times on Sunday. company surnamed Shi.

According to Shi, the business has been managed by the network at the critical time of epidemic prevention and control to ensure personnel safety, speed up recovery and improve supply chain capacity. The company shares its knowledge of epidemic prevention and control via WeChat and offers psychological counseling courses to help employees relax and regain confidence.

Turning

The accelerated pace to bring Shanghai’s business activities back to normal reflects the government’s eagerness to prevent domestic economic growth from slowing further, as the economic suspension of China’s financial and logistics hub has dampened growth in the river delta. Yangtze, and should have some impact on China’s overall economic growth as well.

“As Shanghai and the Yangtze River Delta are important production bases in China, the economic shutdown in these regions will weigh heavily on China’s industrial and production performance,” said Cong Yi, a professor at the University. finance and economy of Tianjin. Hours on Sunday.

This has already manifested itself in recent economic statistics. For example, many cities in eastern China’s Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces saw double-digit declines in government revenue in April, including Suzhou, Hangzhou and Ningbo.

China’s export growth in April, which stood at 3.9%, was also below market expectations.

Therefore, the resumption of economic activities in Shanghai could lead to a turning point in the economy’s recent downward trend, as the Chinese economy is expected to rebound in late May or June, experts said.

“Shanghai’s resumption of work is a signal that the government is taking measures to offset the impact of the COVID-19 situation on the second-quarter economy,” Cong said, forecasting second-quarter GDP growth. should be around 4%, down from 4.8%. in the first trimester.

CITIC Futures predicted in a report released on April 30 that second-quarter GDP would grow 4.2% year-on-year.

He said once the pandemic is fully contained, China will provide a strong set of stimulus policies to revive the economy in the second half of this year.

Xi Junyang agreed that the negative influence of COVID-19 outbreaks will peak in the second quarter, with April-June GDP growth slipping to around 3 percent and the consumer inflation index hitting around 2.5. But with the economic recovery in place, the economy will begin to recover from June.

“A full recovery will take another two or three months, as the city will still be strict on pandemic control and prevention, and it is difficult for the economy to return to pre-pandemic levels. But a rebound is sure,” Xi said.

Economists offered a number of suggestions at the 2022 Tsinghua PBCSF Chief Economist Forum held in Beijing on Saturday. Yu Yongding, a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said China should consider expansionary fiscal and monetary policies to boost domestic demand and boost imports, as well as increase imports of raw materials and strategic goods.

Guan Tao, chief global economist at BOC International, also said that with China’s large economic size, broad policy space and policy space, China should have the confidence, capacity and conditions to do in the face of current challenges.

“The key is to do China’s business, stabilize the macroeconomy, and maintain China’s leading role in pandemic prevention/control and economic recovery,” Guan said.

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Dr. Gao Wenbao addresses SID’s 60th anniversary celebration, introducing three innovation concepts https://hoteloliebol.com/dr-gao-wenbao-addresses-sids-60th-anniversary-celebration-introducing-three-innovation-concepts/ Fri, 13 May 2022 08:47:00 +0000 https://hoteloliebol.com/dr-gao-wenbao-addresses-sids-60th-anniversary-celebration-introducing-three-innovation-concepts/ SAN JOSE, CA., May 13, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — About May 11SID Display Week 2022, a leading event in the display industry, opened in San Jose, United States. This coincides with the 60th anniversary celebration of the Society for Information Display (SID). As a prominent entrepreneur and industry expert, Dr. Gao Wenbao, Chairman of BOE, was […]]]>

SAN JOSE, CA., May 13, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — About May 11SID Display Week 2022, a leading event in the display industry, opened in San Jose, United States. This coincides with the 60th anniversary celebration of the Society for Information Display (SID). As a prominent entrepreneur and industry expert, Dr. Gao Wenbao, Chairman of BOE, was invited to deliver a keynote speech at the celebration. In his keynote speech, Gao shared his insights on the status quo and development trends of the global display industry and introduced three innovation concepts crucial for the sustainable development of the display industry. display, which resonated with attendees.

Gao is the only Chinese semiconductor display entrepreneur who was invited to speak at the celebration. He said that since its establishment in 1962, SID has served as a comprehensive communication and cooperation platform covering technology, materials, equipment and applications and played a central role in the commercialization of display technologies of peak, becoming the most prestigious gathering in the display industry. . Founded in 1993, BOE has become a global leader in the solid state display industry. During its epic journey, BOE has spearheaded the development of China the display industry, which has become an integral part of the global display sector. Since 2014, BOE has forged close ties with SID. Going forward, BOE will continue to work alongside SID to promote the healthy and sustainable development of the display industry.

Due to changes in the global political and economic landscapes and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the display industry has faced a variety of challenges such as the relationship between supply and demand and fluctuations in panel prices. Meanwhile, resource integration and structural optimization are happening in the industry at a faster pace. As it concentrates, the industry is expected to remain on a steady path. In the face of challenges and opportunities, Gao proposed three key innovation concepts for the proper development of the display industry.

Unleash the vitality of industrial development through technological innovation. Innovation is the engine of industrial development, and technological innovation is the foundation of enterprise development. Technological innovation should revolve around market and customer demands, and it is the most fundamental way to offset the impact of cyclical fluctuations and promote the healthy development of the industry. Over the years, BOE has been dedicated to innovation. In 2021, it invested more than 10 billion RMB in R&D and has remained among the world’s top 10 in terms of patent applications for five consecutive years. Additionally, the company has published more than 300 forward-looking technical papers and launched more than 260 breakthrough technologies and products through the SID platform and received a total of 13 innovation awards, including DIA and People’s Choice Awards. BOE has led or participated in the development of over 300 industry standards, gradually transforming itself from a leader in technological innovation into an industry standards body. BOE has been constantly innovating TFT-LCD, OLED and Mini/Micro LED and driving the industry upgrade with cutting-edge display technologies and products designed for customers across a wide range of industries. industries, giving strong impetus to market demand and industry vitality.

Promote the upgrading of the industry value chain through business innovation. Over the past two decades, the rapid development of the display industry has been widely attributed to the construction of new production lines. However, unhealthy competition between companies in terms of capacity and scale possesses further complicated the industrial environment. Therefore, the display industry urgently needs a healthier and more sustainable growth model. In December 2021BOE launched the first technology brand in China the solid-state display industry, marking the beginning of its “technology + brand” dual-drive model and a milestone for the industry. Its one-stop display solutions under the technology brand have enabled various industries not only to increase the premium and added value of display devices, but also to inspire the entire industry to shift from the pursuit of scale to the new technology-driven and even value-driven development path. creation. This has accelerated the expansion and upgrading of the entire industry value chain.

Navigating industry leaps and bounds development through application innovation. Nowadays, screens have become the first point of contact and the key interface for information interaction, and display technologies and smart devices have penetrated into countless scenarios of daily life, heralding the era where “screens are ubiquitous”. In the new round of industrial revolution represented by 5G, AI big data, IoT and other advanced technologies, digital and intelligent applications are ushering in a new era of “Internet of screens”, offering new opportunities for an IoT market worth billions of yuan. Guided by the “Internet of Displays” strategy, BOE brings feature-rich displays in various forms to a wider range of scenarios and accelerates the integration of display technology and IoT applications to enable countless scenarios. By doing so, it leads the whole industrial chain towards the new era of IoT.

Gao called on companies to proactively shoulder their corporate social responsibility and work together to create a green, healthy and sustainable environment while pursuing innovation-driven development. Over the years, BOE has integrated the green concept into the full life cycle of R&D and production, and actively promoted energy conservation and green development through technological innovation. The amount of electricity saved per year can meet the needs of 100,000 Chinese households throughout the year, and the amount of water saved is equivalent to the annual water consumption of nearly 50,000 Chinese households. Currently, BOE has 12 smart factories which have been designated as “national green factories”. Green applications driven by technological innovation represent a major trend in the industry. BOE’s products are energy efficient, recyclable and eye-friendly, among other benefits. The digital badges worn by BOE volunteers. In addition, the company has strengthened digital education in rural areas through smart education solutions with the aim of helping to reduce urban-rural gaps in education and cultivate an enabling environment for the industry and society.

Innovation is an endless pursuit. In the future, BOE will continue to fully play its role as an industry leader and join forces with industry chain partners to create more value and realize the vision of “internet of screens”, bringing thus the industry into a new stage of sound and sustainable development.

SOURCEBOE Technology Group Co., Ltd.

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The regulatory environment influences emissions reductions – Greeley Tribune https://hoteloliebol.com/the-regulatory-environment-influences-emissions-reductions-greeley-tribune/ Tue, 10 May 2022 00:37:44 +0000 https://hoteloliebol.com/the-regulatory-environment-influences-emissions-reductions-greeley-tribune/ LOVELAND — Will Toor, director of the Colorado Bureau of Energy, has been riding a wave of what he described as “pent-up demand for conservation legislation” since Governor Jared Polis was elected and control of the Legislative Assembly by a Democratic majority. And this wave encompasses all major economic sectors that generate greenhouse gases: utilities, […]]]>

LOVELAND — Will Toor, director of the Colorado Bureau of Energy, has been riding a wave of what he described as “pent-up demand for conservation legislation” since Governor Jared Polis was elected and control of the Legislative Assembly by a Democratic majority.

And this wave encompasses all major economic sectors that generate greenhouse gases: utilities, transportation, the oil and gas industry, building energy use, and industry.

Toor was the keynote speaker at the BizWest Net Zero Cities event held Wednesday at the Ranch event complex in Loveland.

The most comprehensive legislation, Toor said, was the passage of House Bill 19-1261, which set greenhouse gas reduction targets of 50% by 2030 and 90% by by 2050. Everything else fell below that using regulatory and fiscal measures to help drive change.

Utilities

Toor said the state has put climate issues at the heart of utility regulation. “It took the voluntary aspirations of Xcel and put them into law,” he said. Then, these were designed to apply to other state utilities as well. The state also began calculating the social costs of carbon and methane emissions and applying them to the regulatory structures created.

The effect of regulation as well as voluntary acts by utilities – to derive economic benefit from the lower costs of generating electricity from wind or solar compared to what it costs to generate electricity from coal – led to a projected 80% reduction in greenhouse gases from utilities by 2030, well ahead of the target. Xcel, the state’s largest power producer, will likely phase out all coal generation by 2031, Toor said.

“It wasn’t that long ago that Colorado was one of the biggest coal consumers in the country,” he said. “It’s a remarkable transformation.”

The state has also emphasized “just transition” for coal-mining communities such as Pueblo, Hayden and Craig, where coal-fired power plants are an important part of the local economy. Amortization provisions have been put in place to help these communities, he said.

oil and gas

Toor said a 60% target has been set for the oil and gas industry to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. He said strategies include a higher frequency of leak detection and repair. Companies in the sector will be required to develop individualized plans to achieve the targets.

Industrial sector

Reductions in the industrial sector will be slower than with utilities and the oil and gas industry, and efforts are underway with national and international companies to ensure that an industry does not just shift its emissions to another part of the world where the regulations are less strict. strict.

The greenhouse gas reduction target for industry is 20%, he said.

Strategies include facility audits looking for profitable opportunities and technologies that industries would then be required to implement.

Toor cited the Pueblo steel mill which, thanks to recent investments, is now among the most efficient in the world because it uses an electric arc furnace to produce the steel. “It’s getting closer to something like zero-emission steel production,” he said.

Buildings

Buildings, as well as the transport sector, pose problems of scale, because “you have millions of generators” of greenhouse gases. The state is “creating a set of tools to decarbonize buildings,” he said. Tools could include the use of electric heat pumps instead of more traditional heating systems. Senate Bill 246 established rebates for customers who add heat pumps, as well as a state “green bank” to help building owners fund some of the changes.

The objective in this economic sector is a 20% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

Transportation

Now that utilities are on track to reduce their emissions, the transportation sector is the biggest generator of greenhouse gases.

“Obviously this involves a lot of different people, from local governments to individuals, making decisions about what vehicles they’re going to get and where they’re going to live versus work,” Toor said.

The state will make major investments in electric vehicle infrastructure — statewide charging stations, for example — and incentives for vehicle fleets, including school buses.

“The diesel school bus for some children causes the highest exposure to air pollution in their lifetime,” he said. Once these buses are replaced with battery-powered fleets, the state may have the option of operating these batteries during off-peak hours to store excess solar power.

In response to a question about what is not being done to address climate change, Toor said he was interested in land use as a factor in energy decisions – “building houses where the jobs are found”.

He also said nuclear power generation was among the technologies the state may need to use to achieve 100% renewable energy. “When you look beyond 2030, how do you go from 90% to 100%,” he asked. Nuclear and hydrogen technologies can be part of the solutions, but “very few utilities are considering nuclear” right now.

This article was first published by BizWest, an independent news agency, and is published under a license agreement. © 2022 BizWestMedia LLC.

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Shipping industry wants global rules on emissions https://hoteloliebol.com/shipping-industry-wants-global-rules-on-emissions/ Sun, 08 May 2022 07:09:28 +0000 https://hoteloliebol.com/shipping-industry-wants-global-rules-on-emissions/ The shipping industry, among the world’s biggest polluters, is asking a key regulator to revise its emissions guidelines so that all carriers work to the same regulations as they make costly changes needed to cut production harmful carbon. With around 90% of global trade transported by sea, the industry emits more carbon each year than […]]]>

The shipping industry, among the world’s biggest polluters, is asking a key regulator to revise its emissions guidelines so that all carriers work to the same regulations as they make costly changes needed to cut production harmful carbon.

With around 90% of global trade transported by sea, the industry emits more carbon each year than Germany and the Netherlands combined. And if shipping were a country, it would be the sixth largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world, according to the World Economic Forum.

The World Shipping Council, whose members operate 90% of the world’s container shipping capacity, wants the International Maritime Organization – a United Nations watchdog – to review its regulations on greenhouse gas emissions.

The board, whose members include AP Moller-Maersk, Cosco Shipping Holdings Co. and MSC Mediterranean Shipping Co., is calling for “global, enforceable multilateral regulation to avoid the race to the bottom,” said Jan Hoffmann, head of logistics. Trade at the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. “They don’t really care about that level of regulation as long as it’s the same for everyone.”

The Global Maritime Forum estimates that fully decarbonizing the maritime sector by 2050 will require up to $95 billion in investment per year starting in the next decade. That compares to the $25 billion that climate change could cost industry each year by the end of the century, according to a report by the Environmental Defense Fund. The global net profits of the container port industry in 2019 totaled around this amount.

Companies that invest in alternative energy “are likely to gain efficiencies, which will lead to huge cost reductions,” said Josue Velazquez Martinez, associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Transportation and Logistics. “There is strong interest.

The International Maritime Organization’s Marine Environment Protection Committee will meet in June to discuss the progress of its strategy on greenhouse gas emissions.

The current framework sets a 50% reduction in emissions by 2050, well below what is needed to align the sector with the ambitions of the Paris Agreement on limiting temperature increases. To address this, the committee recommended that all member states decarbonize completely by then, but a majority, including Saudi Arabia and China, voted against it last year.

Bringing the 175 member states of the International Maritime Organization to consensus is far from easy. At the organization’s last session in November, they failed to impose a tiny CO2-based tax on ships’ fuel consumption, with many countries worrying about the tax.

In the European Union, there are plans to include maritime transport in the bloc’s emissions trading system, which aims to stimulate the adoption of sustainable fuels. The system’s rules would apply to 100% of emissions from ships sailing to and from EU member states, and 50% of discharges from ships traveling between the bloc and non-member states.

Achieving the green transition is “both technically and politically very challenging,” said World Shipping Council President John Butler. “It’s a bit of a mad rush, frankly, to say ‘it’s going to happen on this date’ or ‘it’s going to happen on this date’. What we have to do is keep moving forward.”

Freighters generally run on oil, which produces particularly high carbon dioxide emissions, but innovation efforts are increasing. The number of zero-carbon shipping projects has nearly doubled in the past year, according to the Getting to Zero coalition, made up of more than 150 industry companies.

Maersk, the second largest shipping company in the world, alone consumes about 12 million tons of oil per year, the same amount produced daily in the world. Yet it promises to become carbon neutral by 2040, a decade ahead of its own schedule.

The Copenhagen-based carrier aims to operate its first methanol-powered vessel by summer 2023, said Jacob Sterling, its decarbonization manager. Finding fuel for the objective was not easy.

“We got into this chicken-and-egg dilemma where we tried to convince people to produce green methanol,” Sterling said. Suppliers refused to make a firm commitment because Maersk did not yet have green ships that would run on this fuel. “It was like we were going in circles.”

At the same time, the transition to cleaner fuel is going to be difficult because “shipping will be competing for the same green electrons as other industries,” said Jan Dieleman, president of Cargill’s Ocean Transportation business.

With many ports carrying record cargoes, the situation could get worse. Assuming a steady growth rate, global trade volumes are expected to reach 120 billion tonnes in 2100 – but in the worst climate scenario, that growth could be stunted by nearly 10%, according to the Environmental Defense Fund.

“As trade grows and we don’t move away from fossil fuels, emissions from the shipping sector will also increase,” said Marie Cabbia Hubatova, one of the fund’s report authors. “One way of looking at it is, ‘If I’m not decarbonizing, then I’m basically self-destructive. The shows I produce will end up costing me a lot of money in damages caused by climate change. “”

Information for this article was provided by Jack Wittels of Bloomberg News.

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Building an economic system based on trust: The Tribune India https://hoteloliebol.com/building-an-economic-system-based-on-trust-the-tribune-india/ Fri, 06 May 2022 00:15:00 +0000 https://hoteloliebol.com/building-an-economic-system-based-on-trust-the-tribune-india/ Tarun Das Former Managing Director, CII Expectations for economic reforms have been consistently high since 2014. The level of aspiration of the Indian economy has increased. The overall ambition of the Indian industry is higher. But for Covid-19, Indian economy and industry might have been in a different place by now. Or, […]]]>


Tarun Das


Former Managing Director, CII

Expectations for economic reforms have been consistently high since 2014. The level of aspiration of the Indian economy has increased. The overall ambition of the Indian industry is higher. But for Covid-19, Indian economy and industry might have been in a different place by now. Or, another way of looking at it would be to acknowledge that the whole world has been anchored by Covid-19 and India has necessarily been part of it. But in many ways Indian industry has weathered the massive challenges of the past two years with a new level of resolve, a tribute to entrepreneurs and managers.

A clear realization has been the role of the expanding, growing and multiplying private sector. The past history of the public sector occupying the heights of the economy has been set aside, except in the very strategic defense industries. But the remnants of post-independence distrust of the private sector are still reflected in the multiple processes and checks that exist. As the private sector questions itself and the centrality of its place in the Indian economy, does it think?

How to move to an economic system based on trust, which necessarily means that India would automatically rank among the best in terms of “ease of doing business”? Trust must be earned for trust to be given. The many scams make it very difficult to move to a system of self-regulation vis-à-vis the private sector, unless companies take responsibility for the voluntary and transparent disclosure of company information and take special initiatives to Gain someone’s trust.

An outstanding precedent was the Corporate Governance Code overseen by a CII task force chaired by Rahul Bajaj long before the government and/or SEBI came into the picture. This code has been implemented voluntarily by many companies and is an outstanding example of private sector leadership.

Therefore, to deepen and broaden the base of trust, businesses and industry must extend this example to other areas. And this is clearly achievable if mainstream private sector companies become more open and socially conscious. The best companies would also be able to influence and impact thousands of companies in their supply chains, creating a mass of companies adopting the highest standards of conduct.

The government can then respond by relaxing its compliance requirements so that the country can move towards a trust-based system. The initiative must first be owned by the private sector to build public trust, not just government. When the general public says it finds the private sector trustworthy, because it is not deceived, the government is able to act. Integrating the private sector into society is key.

The trust-based system will also have a positive impact on corruption at different levels, adding to the digitization dynamic that is already promoting transparency. Today, thanks to smartphones, bank accounts and Aadhaar cards of the poorest of the poor, the quality of life at the bottom of the pyramid has steadily improved, the great benefits of using technology to meet the basic daily needs of life!

Technology can and does take India very far, but corporate leadership must engage strongly and sustainably with its own action (not to mention), such as:

l Caring for workers and investing in their well-being, including health and education, provision of retirement and provident funds.

l CSR projects and programs, not to evade taxes, but to align with the community and support their true development.

‘Affirmative Action’ to voluntarily provide employment, especially to SCs, STs and other backward classes who have long suffered indignity.

l Address the growing level of inequality for which the industry must maintain a balance between the highest paid and the lowest paid so that the ratio is reasonable. This means raising the lower income levels and possibly lowering the higher pay levels.

l Invest in people, especially young people, through skills development programs and scholarships, to equip them for productive employment or even self-employment. Industry is the ‘user’ of people and it is only natural for industry to establish skills development centers across India and manage/lead ITIs.

l Invest in clean energy so that the environmental legacy for future generations is much better than today. Industry can make an enormous contribution to meeting the challenges of pollution and environmental degradation. Each company can take on specific tasks and set net zero goals

l Support women in their education and empowerment as they are at the heart of the family and society. Women can make a huge difference to the nation and the industry and must take special responsibility for that to happen.

l Maintain a balance in terms of price and profit in order to provide goods and services at the lowest possible cost. High prices, high profits and high dividends must have a self-regulating ceiling so that consumer interest and well-being are constant.

l Research, development and innovation help create new products and services and should be on the list of priority action points for industry. It is creativity for the future and benefits everyone, the producer and the customer.

l The customer is king. If this philosophy is embraced and followed, the Indian industry will be in a different place. For too long the consumer, the customer, has suffered from neglect. Many things have changed, but more changes are needed.

l Housing is an area of ​​particular focus as hundreds of thousands of would-be homeowners have fallen victim to real estate scams. Real estate companies have a special responsibility.

This is an illustrative list of industry actions, not exhaustive. The ecosystem of a trust-based society must start with business and industry. They can do that if they want or continue with the existing system of complex compliance challenges that make life miserable for everyone. Some companies do some things right, most companies now have to do most things right. It comes with the promise of a bigger role.

All of this, and more, is the need for an economic system based on trust. It takes two hands to clap, but the hand that needs to move first is the industry hand. Change overnight can be difficult, but significant progress is possible.

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Kanani Industries Consolidated Net Income Increases 661.54% in March 2022 Quarter https://hoteloliebol.com/kanani-industries-consolidated-net-income-increases-661-54-in-march-2022-quarter/ Wed, 04 May 2022 12:45:00 +0000 https://hoteloliebol.com/kanani-industries-consolidated-net-income-increases-661-54-in-march-2022-quarter/ Sales drop 51.45% to Rs 42.55 crore Net profit of Kanani Industries increased by 661.54% to Rs 0.99 crore in the quarter ended March 2022 from Rs 0.13 crore in the previous quarter ended March 2021. Sales decreased by 51 .45% to Rs 42.55 crore in the quarter ended March 2022 compared to […]]]>


Sales drop 51.45% to Rs 42.55 crore

Net profit of Kanani Industries increased by 661.54% to Rs 0.99 crore in the quarter ended March 2022 from Rs 0.13 crore in the previous quarter ended March 2021. Sales decreased by 51 .45% to Rs 42.55 crore in the quarter ended March 2022 compared to Rs 87.64 crore in the previous quarter ended March 2021.

For the full year, net profit increased by 311.36% to Rs 1.81 crore in the year ended March 2022 from Rs 0.44 crore in the previous year ended March 2021 Sales decreased by 6.69% to Rs 290.73 crore in the year ended March 2022 from Rs 311.58 crore in the previous year ended March 2021.



DetailsQuarter endedYear endedMarch 2022March 2021% Var.March 2022March 2021% Var.Sales42.5587.64 -51 290.73311.58 -7 OPM %1.340.09 0.590.28 PBDT1.140.17 571 2.100.64 228 PBT1.120.15 647 2.010.54 272 PN0.990.13 662 1.810.44 311

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(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


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First published: Wednesday 04 May 2022. 18:15 IST

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NABORS INDUSTRIES LTD MANAGEMENT REPORT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Form 10-Q) https://hoteloliebol.com/nabors-industries-ltd-management-report-of-financial-position-and-results-of-operations-form-10-q/ Mon, 02 May 2022 21:19:11 +0000 https://hoteloliebol.com/nabors-industries-ltd-management-report-of-financial-position-and-results-of-operations-form-10-q/ We often discuss expectations regarding our future markets, demand for our products and services, and our performance in our annual, quarterly and current reports, press releases, and other written and oral statements. Statements relating to matters that are not historical facts are "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of Section 27A […]]]>
We often discuss expectations regarding our future markets, demand for our
products and services, and our performance in our annual, quarterly and current
reports, press releases, and other written and oral statements. Statements
relating to matters that are not historical facts are "forward-looking
statements" within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of Section 27A of
the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act") and Section 21E of
the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"). These
"forward-looking statements" are based on an analysis of currently available
competitive, financial and economic data and our operating plans. They are
inherently uncertain and investors should recognize that events and actual
results could turn out to be significantly different from our expectations. By
way of illustration, when used in this document, words such as "anticipate,"
"believe," "expect," "plan," "intend," "estimate," "project," "will," "should,"
"could," "may," "predict" and similar expressions are intended to identify
forward-looking statements.

You should consider the following key factors when evaluating these forward-looking statements:

? actual and potential political or economic instability, civil unrest, war

or acts of terrorism involving any of the countries in which we operate;

? the novel coronavirus (“COVID-19”) pandemic and its impact on our operations as

as well as oil and gas markets and prices;

? fluctuations and volatility in world oil prices and demand and

natural gas;

? fluctuations in levels of oil and natural gas exploration and development

Activities;

? fluctuations in demand for our services;

? competitive and technological changes and other developments in the oil and gas industry

and oil service industries;

? our ability to renew customer contracts in order to maintain our competitiveness;

? the existence of operational risks inherent in oil and gas and oilfields

service industries;

? the possibility of the loss of one or more of our major customers;

? the impact of long-term debt and other financial commitments on our

financial and operational flexibility;

our access and cost of capital, including the impact of a new

? deterioration in our credit rating, covenant restrictions, availability under our

secured revolving credit facility and future debt or equity issuances

securities;

? our dependence on our operating subsidiaries and our investments to meet our

financial obligations;

? our ability to retain qualified employees;

? our ability to successfully complete and realize the expected benefits of

transactions;

? changes in tax laws and the possibility of changes in other laws and

regulations;

? the possibility of changes to WE trade policies and regulations, including

imposition of embargoes or trade sanctions; and

? general economic conditions, including capital and credit markets.



Our business depends, to a large degree, on the level of spending by oil and gas
companies for exploration, development and production activities. Therefore, a
sustained increase or decrease in the price of oil or natural gas, that

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Contents


has a material impact on exploration, development and production activities,
could also materially affect our financial position, results of operations and
cash flows.

The above description of risks and uncertainties is by no means all-inclusive
but highlights certain factors that we believe are important for your
consideration. For a more detailed description of risk factors that may affect
us or our industry, please refer to Item 1A. - Risk Factors in our 2021 Annual
Report.

Management Overview

This section is intended to help you understand our results of operations and
our financial condition. This information is provided as a supplement to, and
should be read in conjunction with, our condensed consolidated financial
statements and the accompanying notes thereto.

We are a leading provider of advanced technology for the energy industry. With
operations in over 15 countries, Nabors has established a global network of
people, technology and equipment to deploy solutions that deliver safe,
efficient and sustainable energy production. By leveraging its core
competencies, particularly in drilling, engineering, automation, data science
and manufacturing, Nabors aims to innovate the future of energy and enable the
transition to a lower carbon world.

Outlook


The demand for our services and products is a function of the level of spending
by oil and gas companies for exploration, development and production activities.
The level of exploration, development and production activities is to a large
extent tied to the prices of oil and natural gas, which can fluctuate
significantly, are highly volatile and tend to be highly sensitive to supply and
demand cycles. Additionally, some oil and gas companies may intentionally limit
their capital spending to a percentage of their operating cash flows which may
differ from how they have historically made capital allocation decisions.

During 2020, the oil markets experienced unprecedented volatility. The COVID-19
outbreak, and its development into a pandemic, along with policies and actions
taken by governments and behaviors of companies and customers around the world,
had a significant negative impact on demand for oil and gas and by extension our
services, which negatively impacted our operating results and cash flow
throughout 2020 and into 2021. The Lower-48 drilling rig market began to
stabilize during the second half of 2020 and continued to improve at a measured
rate throughout 2021. We expect continued measured but steady increases in
activity throughout the remainder of 2022 for the Lower-48 market. Our
International markets also experienced factors and conditions that led to
similar reductions in activity throughout 2020, but the impact varied
considerably from country to country. Since 2020, we have seen a substantial
resumption of activity to near pre-COVID-19 levels. As government-imposed
restrictions continue to ease, we expect our international activity to generally
increase through the remainder of the year.

More recently, several global commodity markets, including oil and gas, have
been impacted by the effects of the war in Ukraine. These consequences include
severe economic sanctions against the Russian government as well as certain
Russian businesses and individuals, in addition to a reorientation of the global
sources of oil and gas supply and a significant increase in the related
commodity prices. While higher commodity prices have historically led to an
increase in oilfield activity, the ultimate outcome of these events and the
impact on our business remains uncertain.

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

Credit agreement 2022


On January 21, 2022, we entered into a revolving credit agreement between Nabors
Delaware, the guarantors from time to time party thereto, the issuing banks (the
"Issuing Banks") and other lenders party thereto (the "Lenders") and Citibank,
N.A., as administrative agent (the "2022 Credit Agreement"). The 2022 Credit
Agreement replaced the 2018 Revolving Credit Facility. Under the 2022 Credit
Agreement, the Lenders have committed to provide up to an aggregate principal
amount at any time outstanding not in excess of $350.0 million (with an
accordion feature for an additional $100.0 million) to Nabors Delaware under a
secured revolving credit facility, including sub-facilities provided by certain
of the Lenders for letters of credit in an aggregate principal amount at any
time outstanding not in excess of $100.0 million. The facility matures on the
earlier of (a) January 21, 2026 and (b) (i) to the extent any principal amount
of

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  Table of Contents

Nabors Delaware's existing 5.1% senior notes due 2023, 5.5% senior notes due
2023 and 5.75% senior notes due 2025 remains outstanding on the date that is 90
days prior to the applicable maturity date for such indebtedness, then such 90th
day or (ii) to the extent 50% or more of the outstanding (as of the closing
date) aggregate principal amount of the 0.75% senior exchangeable notes due 2024
remains outstanding and not refinanced or defeased on the date that is 90 days
prior to the maturity date for such indebtedness, then such 90th day.

Financial results

Comparison of the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021

Operating revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2022 totaled $568.5 millionwhich represents an increase of $108.0 millionor 23%, compared to the three months ended March 31, 2021. All of our operating segments, with the exception of Canada Drilling due to its sale, experienced an increase in revenues during this period. For a more detailed description of operating results, see segment operating results below.


Net loss from continuing operations attributable to Nabors common shareholders
totaled $184.5 million ($22.51 per diluted share) for the three months ended
March 31, 2022 compared to a net loss from continuing operations attributable to
Nabors common shareholders of $140.8 million ($20.16 per diluted share) for the
three months ended March 31, 2021, or a $43.7 million increase in the net loss.
The majority of the increase in net loss is attributable to $73.2 million in
mark-to-market losses from the common stock warrants that were outstanding
during the first quarter of 2022. These losses were partially offset by improved
market conditions in all our segments from the prior year, together with lower
depreciation.

General and administrative expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2022
totaled $53.6 million, representing a decrease of $1.0 million, or 2%, compared
to the three months ended March 31, 2021.

Research and engineering expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2022
totaled $11.7 million, representing an increase of $4.1 million, or 56%,
compared to the three months ended March 31, 2021. This is primarily reflective
of an increase in research and development activities, along with the higher
general operating activity levels, as market conditions have improved.

Depreciation and amortization expense for the three months ended March 31, 2022
was $164.4 million, representing a decrease of $12.9 million, or 7%, compared to
the three months ended March 31, 2021. The decrease is attributable to the
combination of a reduction in depreciation as a result of the many assets that
have recently reached the end of their useful lives and limited capital
expenditures over recent years. The decrease is also due to the sale of Canada
Drilling assets in July 2021.

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Contents

Segment operating results

The following tables present certain information regarding our reportable segments and our drilling activity:

                                                               Three Months Ended
                                                                    March 31,
                                                               2022          2021        Increase/(Decrease)

                                                        (In thousands, except percentages and rig activity)
U.S. Drilling
Operating revenues                                           $ 217,583    $  142,299    $      75,284       53 %
Adjusted operating income (loss) (1)                         $ (5,851)    $
(23,336)    $      17,485       75 %
Average rigs working (2)                                          90.3          60.5             29.8       49 %

Canada Drilling
Operating revenues                                           $       -    $   20,989    $    (20,989)    (100) %
Adjusted operating income (loss) (1)                         $    (19)    $
   3,907    $     (3,926)    (100) %
Average rigs working (2)                                             -          13.7           (13.7)    (100) %

International Drilling
Operating revenues                                           $ 279,030    $  246,838    $      32,192       13 %
Adjusted operating income (loss) (1)                         $ (6,327)    $
(18,632)    $      12,305       66 %
Average rigs working (2)                                          72.0          64.8              7.2       11 %

Drilling Solutions
Operating revenues                                           $  54,182    $   35,706    $      18,476       52 %
Adjusted operating income (loss) (1)                         $  14,709    $
   4,710    $       9,999      212 %

Rig Technologies
Operating revenues                                           $  36,736    $   25,748    $      10,988       43 %
Adjusted operating income (loss) (1)                         $ (2,751)    $

(2,569) ($182) (7)%

Adjusted operating profit (loss) is our measure of segment profit and loss. (1) See Note 11-Segment information to the consolidated financial statements

included in point 1 of the report.

Represents a measure of the average number of platforms in operation during a

period. For example, a rig running 45 days in a quarter represents (2) approximately 0.5 average rigs running during the quarter. Over an annual period,

a platform running 182.5 days is about 0.5 average platform

    working for the year.


U.S. Drilling
Operating revenues for our U.S. Drilling segment increased by $75.3 million or
53% during the three months ended March 31, 2022 compared to the corresponding
period in 2021. This increase was due to a 49% increase in the average rigs
working, reflecting increased drilling activity as market conditions and demand
for our drilling services have rebounded and increased since the prior year.

Drilling Canada

Operating revenue decreased in the three months ended March 31, 2022
compared to the same period last year due to the sale of the assets of Canada Drilling in July 2021.

International drilling


Operating revenues for our International Drilling segment increased by $32.2
million or 13% compared to the corresponding prior year period. This increase
was due to an 11% increase in the average rigs working, reflecting increased
drilling activity as market conditions and demand for our drilling services have
rebounded and increased since the prior year.

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  Table of Contents

Drilling Solutions

Operating revenues for this segment increased by $18.5 million or 52% during the
three months ended March 31, 2022 compared to the corresponding period in 2021
as market conditions and demand for our services have rebounded and drilling
activity has increased since the prior year.

Platform Technologies

Operating revenue from our Rig Technologies segment increased by $11.0 million
or 43% during the three months ended March 31, 2022 compared to the corresponding period, as market conditions and demand for our services improved slightly from the previous year.

Other financial information

Interest expense


Interest expense for the three months ended March 31, 2022 was $46.9 million,
representing an increase of $3.9 million, or 9%, compared to the three months
ended March 31, 2021. The increase was primarily due to the issuance of $700
million in 7.375% senior priority guaranteed notes due May 2027 in November
2021, partially offset by a reduction to our overall debt levels, outstanding
notes and credit facilities.

Other, net

Other, net for the three months ended March 31, 2022 was $80.4 million of loss.
Approximately $73.2 million of this amount related to mark-to-market losses from
the common stock warrants. In addition, there were $4.2 million in foreign
currency loss and an increase of $3.1 million in litigation reserves.

Other, net for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was $7.3 million of loss,
which included a net gain on debt buybacks of $8.1 million. This was offset by
net losses on sales and disposals of assets of approximately $8.5 million,
foreign currency loss of $2.4 million and an increase in litigation reserves of
$1.5 million.

Income taxes

Our worldwide tax expense for the three months ended March 31, 2022 was $13.7
million compared to $9.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021. The
increase in tax expense was primarily attributable to the improvement in income
before income taxes, excluding the mark-to-market losses related to the common
stock warrants, and the geographic mix of our pre-tax earnings (losses).

Cash and capital resources

Financial situation and sources of liquidity


Our primary sources of liquidity are cash and investments, availability under
our revolving credit facility and cash generated from operations. As of
March 31, 2022, we had cash and short-term investments of $394.0 million and
working capital of $430.6 million. As of December 31, 2021, we had cash and
short-term investments of $991.5 million and working capital of $1.0 billion.

To March 31, 2022we had no outstanding borrowings under the 2022 Credit Agreement, which has an aggregate borrowing capacity of $350.0 million.


The 2022 Credit Agreement requires us to maintain an interest coverage ratio
(EBITDA/interest expense), which increases on a quarterly basis, and a minimum
guarantor value, requiring the guarantors (other than the Company) and their
subsidiaries to own at least 90% of the consolidated property, plant and
equipment of the Company. Additionally, the Company is subject to certain
covenants, which are subject to certain exceptions and include, among others,
(i) a covenant restricting our ability to incur liens (subject to the additional
liens basket of up to $150.0 million), (ii) a covenant restricting its ability
to pay dividends or make other distributions with respect to its capital stock
and to repurchase certain indebtedness and (iii) a covenant restricting the
ability of the Company's subsidiaries to incur debt

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(subject to the grower basket of up to $100.0 million). As of March 31, 2022, we
were in compliance with both the interest coverage ratio and the minimum
guarantor value requirements under the 2022 Credit Agreement. We also had $62.6
million of letters of credit outstanding under the 2022 Credit Agreement.

As of the date of this report, we were in compliance with all covenants under
the 2022 Credit Agreement. If we fail to perform our obligations under the
covenants, the revolving credit commitments under the 2022 Credit Agreement
could be terminated, and any outstanding borrowings under the facilities could
be declared immediately due and payable. If necessary, we have the ability to
manage our covenant compliance by taking certain actions including reductions in
discretionary capital or other types of controllable expenditures, monetization
of assets, amending or renegotiating the revolving credit agreement, accessing
capital markets through a variety of alternative methods, or any combination of
these alternatives. We expect to remain in compliance with all covenants under
the 2022 Credit Agreement during the twelve month period following the date of
this report based on our current operational and financial projections. However,
we can make no assurance of continued compliance if our current projections or
material underlying assumptions prove to be incorrect. If we fail to comply with
the covenants, the revolving credit commitment could be terminated, and any
outstanding borrowings under the facility could be declared immediately due and
payable.

Our ability to access capital markets or to otherwise obtain sufficient
financing may be affected by our senior unsecured debt ratings as provided by
the major credit rating agencies in the United States and our historical ability
to access these markets as needed. While there can be no assurances that we will
be able to access these markets in the future, we believe that we will be able
to access capital markets or otherwise obtain financing in order to satisfy any
payment obligation that might arise upon maturity, exchange or purchase of our
notes and our debt facilities, loss of availability of our revolving credit
facilities and our A/R Facility (see-Accounts Receivable Purchase and Sales
Agreements, below), and that any cash payment due, in addition to our other cash
obligations, would not ultimately have a material adverse impact on our
liquidity or financial position. The major U.S. credit rating agencies have
previously downgraded our senior unsecured debt rating to non-investment grade.
These and any further ratings downgrades could adversely impact our ability to
access debt markets in the future, increase the cost of future debt, and
potentially require us to post letters of credit for certain obligations

We had 18 letter of credit facilities with various banks in March 31, 2022. Availability under these facilities from March 31, 2022 was the following:

                                                                          March 31,
                                                                             2022
                                                                        (In thousands)
Credit available                                                       $        620,552
Less: Letters of credit outstanding, inclusive of financial and
performance guarantees                                                           77,064
Remaining availability                                                 $        543,488

Accounts Receivable Purchase and Sale Agreements


On September 13, 2019, we entered into an accounts receivables sales agreement
(the "A/R Sales Agreement") and an accounts receivables purchase agreement (the
"A/R Purchase Agreement" and, together with the A/R Sales Agreement, the "A/R
Facility"), whereby the originators sold or contributed, and will on an ongoing
basis continue to sell or contribute, certain of their domestic trade accounts
receivables to a wholly-owned, bankruptcy-remote special purpose entity ("SPE").
The SPE in turn, sells, transfers, conveys and assigns to third-party
Purchasers, all the rights, title and interest in and to its pool of eligible
receivables.

On July 13, 2021, we entered into the First Amendment to the A/R Purchase
Agreement which extends the term of the A/R Facility by two years, to August 13,
2023. However, the expiration of the agreement could be accelerated to July 19,
2022, if any of the 5.5% Senior Notes due 2023 of Nabors Delaware remain
outstanding as of such date. The amendment also reduced the commitments of the
third-party Purchasers from $250 million to $150 million, with the possibility
of being increased up to $200 million.

The amount available for purchase under the A/R Facility fluctuates over time
based on the total amount of eligible receivables generated during the normal
course of business after excluding excess concentrations and certain other
ineligible receivables. The maximum purchase commitment of the third-party
Purchasers under the A/R Facility is approximately $150.0 million and the amount
of receivables purchased by the third-party Purchasers as of March 31, 2022
was
$136.0 million.

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The initiators, Nabors Delaware, the Host and the Company provide representations, warranties, covenants and indemnities under the A/R Facility and Indemnity Guarantee. See more details in Note 4 – Contracts for the purchase and sale of accounts receivable.

Future cash requirements


Our current cash and investments, projected cash flows from operations, proceeds
from equity or debt issuances and the facilities under our 2022 Credit Agreement
are expected to adequately finance our purchase commitments, capital
expenditures, acquisitions, scheduled debt service requirements, and all other
expected cash requirements for at least the next 12 months. However, we can make
no assurances that our current operational and financial projections will prove
to be correct. A sustained period of highly depressed oil and natural gas prices
could have a significant effect on our customers' capital expenditure spending
and therefore our operations, cash flows and liquidity.

Purchase commitments outstanding at March 31, 2022 totaled approximately $251.8
million, primarily for capital expenditures, other operating expenses and
purchases of inventory. We can reduce planned expenditures if necessary or
increase them if market conditions and new business opportunities warrant it.
The level of our outstanding purchase commitments and our expected level of
capital expenditures over the next 12 months represent a number of capital
programs that are currently underway or planned.

See our discussion of guarantees issued by Nabors that could have a potential
impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows in future
periods included below under "Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements (Including
Guarantees)."

There were no material changes to the contractual cash obligations that were included in our 2021 Annual Report.


On August 25, 2015, our Board authorized a share repurchase program (the
"program") under which we may repurchase, from time to time, up to $400.0
million of our common shares by various means, including in the open market or
in privately negotiated transactions. Authorization for the program, which was
renewed in February 2019, does not have an expiration date and does not obligate
us to repurchase any of our common shares. Since establishing the program, we
have repurchased 0.3 million of our common shares for an aggregate purchase
price of approximately $121.1 million under this program. The repurchased
shares, which are held by our subsidiaries, are registered and tradable subject
to applicable securities law limitations and have the same voting and other
rights as other outstanding shares. As of March 31, 2022, the remaining amount
authorized under the program that may be used to purchase shares was $278.9
million. As of March 31, 2022, our subsidiaries held 1.1 million of our common
shares.

We may from time to time seek to retire or purchase our outstanding debt through
cash purchases and/or exchanges for equity securities, both in open-market
purchases, privately negotiated transactions or otherwise. Such repurchases or
exchanges, if any, will depend on prevailing market conditions, our liquidity
requirements, contractual restrictions and other factors and may involve
material amounts.

Cash flow


Our cash flows depend, to a large degree, on the level of spending by oil and
gas companies for exploration, development and production activities. Sustained
decreases in the price of oil or natural gas could have a material impact on
these activities and could also materially affect our cash flows. Certain
sources and uses of cash, such as the level of discretionary capital
expenditures or acquisitions, purchases and sales of investments, dividends,
loans, issuances and repurchases of debt and of our common shares are within our
control and are adjusted as necessary based on market conditions. We discuss our
cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 below.

Operating Activities. Net cash provided by operating activities totaled $41.4
million during the three months ended March 31, 2022, compared to net cash
provided of $79.5 million during the corresponding 2021 period. Operating cash
flows are our primary source of capital and liquidity.  Cash from operating
results (before working capital changes) was $68.6 million for the three months
ended March 31, 2022, an increase of $16.5 million when compared to $52.1
million in the corresponding 2021 period. This was due to the increase in
activity across most of our business for the three month period ended March 31,
2022 compared to the three month period ended March 31, 2021. Changes in working

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capital items such as collection of receivables, other deferred revenue
arrangements and payments of operating payables are also significant factors
affecting operating cash flows and can be highly volatile in periods of
increasing or decreasing activity levels. Changes in working capital items used
$27.3 million in cash flows during the three months ended March 31, 2022, a
$54.7 million unfavorable change as compared to the $27.4 million in cash flows
provided from working capital in the corresponding 2021 period.  This is
reflective of the increased working capital requirements that are a result of
activity level increases.

Investing Activities. Net cash used for investing activities totaled $82.1
million during the three months ended March 31, 2022 compared to net cash used
of $19.1 million during the corresponding 2021 period. Our primary use of cash
for investing activities is capital expenditures for rig-related enhancements,
new construction and equipment, as well as sustaining capital expenditures.
During the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021, we used cash for capital
expenditures totaling $84.3 million and $40.9 million, respectively.

We received $3.7 million in proceeds from sales of assets and insurance claims
during the three months ended March 31, 2022 compared to $10.8 million for the
corresponding 2021 period. We also received $10.9 million in sales and
maturities of investments for the three months ended March 31, 2021.

Fundraising activities. Net cash used for financing activities totaled $555.3 million in the three months ended March 31, 2022. In the three months ended March 31, 2022have been paid $460.0 million in net amounts under our revolving credit facility and $86.1 million long-term debt.


Net cash used for financing activities totaled $113.9 million during the three
months ended March 31, 2021. During the three months ended March 31, 2021, we
used $49.1 million for a redeemable non-controlling interest distribution, $40.0
million in net amounts repaid under our revolving credit facility and by a $16.8
million repayment on our senior notes. Additionally, we paid dividends totaling
$3.6 million to our preferred shareholders.

Summarized combined financial information for the securities guarantee of the subsidiaries


Nabors Delaware is an indirect, wholly owned subsidiary of Nabors. Nabors fully
and unconditionally guarantees the due and punctual payment of the principal of,
premium, if any, and interest on Nabors Delaware's registered notes, which are
its (i) 5.10% Senior Notes due 2023 (the "2023 Notes"), (ii) 5.50% Senior Notes
due 2023 (the "5.50% 2023 Notes") and (iii) 5.75% Senior Notes due 2025 (the
"2025 Notes" and, together with the 2023 Notes and the 5.50% 2023 Notes, the
"Registered Notes"), and any other obligations of Nabors Delaware under the
Registered Notes when and as they become due and payable, whether at maturity,
upon redemption, by acceleration or otherwise, if Nabors Delaware is unable to
satisfy these obligations. Nabors' guarantee of Nabors Delaware's obligations
under the Registered Notes are its unsecured and unsubordinated obligation and
have the same ranking with respect to Nabors' indebtedness as the Registered
Notes have with respect to Nabors Delaware's indebtedness. In the event that
Nabors is required to withhold or deduct on account of any Bermudian taxes due
from any payment made under or with respect to its guarantees, subject to
certain exceptions, Nabors will pay additional amounts so that the net amount
received by each holder of Registered Notes will equal the amount that such
holder would have received if the Bermudian taxes had not been required to be
withheld or deducted.

The following summarized financial information is included so that separate
financial statements of Nabors Delaware are not required to be filed with the
SEC. The condensed consolidating financial statements present investments in
both consolidated and unconsolidated affiliates using the equity method of
accounting.

In lieu of providing separate financial statements for issuers and guarantors
(the "Obligated Group"), we have presented the accompanying supplemental
summarized combined balance sheet and income statement information for the
Obligated Group based on Rule 13-01 of the SEC's Regulation S-X that we early
adopted effective April 1, 2020.

All significant intercompany items among the Obligated Group have been
eliminated in the supplemental summarized combined financial information. The
Obligated Group's investment balances in Subsidiary Non-Guarantors have been
excluded from the supplemental combined financial information. Significant
intercompany balances and activity for the Obligated Group with other related
parties, including Subsidiary Non-Guarantors (referred to as "affiliates"), are
presented separately in the accompanying supplemental summarized financial
information.

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Combined condensed balance sheet and income statement information for the
Compulsory group follows (in thousands):

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